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Sand paper sheets:
I know what you're thinking. Uhhhh what? Just hear me out. Put the sand paper underneath your child's worksheet or letter practice sheet, and have them do their worksheet with a pencil. This adds such a rich sensory component, promoting kinesthetic learning and more muscle memory!
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Triangle shaped pencils:
Great for little hands still mastering a tripod grasp. The triangle shape encourages proper placement of the thumb, index, and middle fingers on the pencil.
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Tracing boards:
Great sensory board for an introduction to letters, and there are so many ways to use them! Your kiddo can trace the letters with their finger or the utensil provided, or place beans, buttons, pom-poms, or beads in the letters.
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Loop scissors:
These are a great first step in learning how to use scissors. They require a full hand pinch in order to close, and they open on their own, providing small hands with a friendly and successful introduction to scissor skills.
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Magna-tiles:
Such a great STEM activity for little minds learning to build, attend, and problem solve. If you don't have a set, add it to the list for the next holiday! Your kiddo will be addicted.
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Putty:
Putty is a great way to strengthen little hands. I like these sets because they include small manipulatives you can hide in the putty for your child to pull apart and find. Great strength and fine motor skills builder!
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Tong/scooper set:
These tools provide a variety of hand postures and movements to build fine motor skills.
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Austen's Recommended Amazon Products
For Preschool And Up
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Ned's Head:
One of my favorite games to play with kids. It targets so many skills including tactile discrimination, tactile tolerance, stereognosis, and fine motor skills. Be prepared for lots of laughs!
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Self-stick toss and catch game:
Such a great activity for hand-eye coordination, balance, gross motor skills. Play in different positions to promote core activation, like sitting and kneeling.
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Slant board for writing:
Slant boards help position the wrist in extension, allowing for optimal finger and hand control of a writing utensil. It also helps stabilize the wrist on the writing surface, promoting distal finger movement and more precise movement of a pencil.
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Small chalkboards:
Using chalk is the best medium when practicing lines, shapes, and letters. Chalk provides more resistance than other writing utensils/surfaces, increasing sensory input and therefore learning and skill retention.